York Trunk Sewer and Paisley-Clythe Feeder Main Phase 2

Construction will take place near Lyon Park off of York Road on Brockville Avenue, Florence Lane and the Royal Recreation Trail that runs beside the Eramosa River. The Trail will be closed from Victoria Road to Waterworks Place. Work begins in late fall 2017 and continues until spring 2018.
Phase 2 of the York Trunk Sewer and Paisley-Clythe Feeder Main project includes the installation of 1.5 kilometres of underground water and sewer pipes.

Construction through the York Road and Eramosa River Parks between Gordon Street and the F. M. Woods Pumping Station, and along Waterworks Place out to York Road, began in 2016 and will be completed in fall 2017.

The second stage of Phase 2 construction will begin in late 2017 and takes place through the Eramosa River Park between Boult Avenue and Victoria Road, and Brockville Avenue and Florence Lane. This includes the removal of a number of trees along the Speed River, which will be replaced with new trees once the work is complete.

Road closures and traffic impacts

Brockville Avenue will be closed beginning in early spring 2018 so new water and sewer pipes can be installed under the road. Local access will be maintained. This work is expected to take six months to complete.

Work to install water and sewer pipes under Florence Lane is planned to be done by micro-tunnelling under the roadway. Florence Lane is expected to stay open during this work.

Royal Recreation Trail access and park restoration

The Royal Recreation Trail in Eramosa River Park will be closed from Waterworks Place to Victoria Road from fall 2017 until late spring 2018.

Restoration of parklands along the construction route will include planting new trees to replace those lost or removed as part of construction activity.

Historical landfill

Part of the Phase 2 construction route travels through a known historical landfill. This landfill accepted both industrial and residential waste, and contains materials such as brick, glass, construction materials, fibreglass and household waste. The City has completed extensive environmental testing, including groundwater and soil tests, and is prepared to manage any waste encountered. Read the soil management report summary.

During construction in the area of the former landfill there may be nuisance odours including rotting garbage and mothball-like smells, or petroleum-like smells. To minimize odour issues, construction will be completed in small sections, excavations will be filled with clean fill daily, and waste soil will be removed at the end of each workday. Air quality monitoring will be completed throughout the construction period.

Public and worker safety is the City’s first priority. People can continue to use open trails and parkland throughout the construction period.

There is a larger study underway to determine the future of the historical landfill. Read about more Guelph’s historical landfills and other brownfields.