Notice of Intention to Designate: 43 Arthur Street South

Take notice that the Council of the Corporation of the City of Guelph intends to designate 43 Arthur Street South as a property of cultural heritage value or interest under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chapter 0.18.

Description of property

The property at 43 Arthur Street South is situated on the east side of the Speed River and south of the Guelph Junction Railway tracks in the City of Guelph. The legal description of the subject property is: Part of the Grist Mill Lands East side of River Speed, Plan 113, more particularly described as Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 13 & 14, Reference Plan 61R-21139.

Statement of cultural heritage value or interest (Why the property is being designated)

The subject property is worthy of designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act as it meets all three of the prescribed criteria for determining cultural heritage value or interest according to Ontario Regulation 9/06 made under the Ontario Heritage Act.

The subject property has design value or physical value as representative of 19th and 20th century vernacular industrial architecture in Guelph.  The stone and brick buildings reflect multiple eras of growth and development on the site dating back to the 1830s.

The property has historical value or associative value because this property, together with the mill complex, was Guelph’s first industrial site.  William Allan purchased the “Mill Lands” in 1832 and by 1835 had erected a distillery on the east side of the river, and a carding house in 1841.  The distillery was considerably enlarged during the late 1840s/early 1850s.  A stone rectifying building was added in the 1860s, and the original façade is currently extant.  The 1835 stone building remains on the site as well as part of the enlarged distillery of the 1840s.

In 1881 the distillery property was bought by the Armstrong & McCrae Woollen Company, owned by Thomas McCrae and later by David McCrae, the grandfather and father of John McCrae, one of Guelph’s most well-known residents.  In 1881, the McCraes erected a 4-storey stone building as a new factory adjoining the old distilleries.  In 1882, a new stone factory adjoining the old distillery property was built with two large wings that were connected by a tower.  A scouring house of stone was erected in 1883, followed by a brick smokestack in 1896.

The Guelph Woollen Company went out of business in 1897.  In 1900 the property was sold to the A.R. Woodyatt Company, which became the Taylor-Forbes Company Ltd., one of the largest Canadian manufactures of lawn mowers and general hardware.  The new property owner made a number of major expansions to the property.  In 1956 the property was sold to the W.C. Wood Company –manufacturers of electrical farm equipment.  Additions to the property continued until 1973 when the site was fully developed.

The property has contextual value in that the former Allan’s Mill property is a significant industrial landmark dating back to Guelph’s earliest period of industrial development.  The buildings are physically, functionally, visually and historically linked to their immediate setting along the Speed River and visually define the east edge of the Speed River (the original town boundary) as a downtown landmark.

Description of heritage attributes (What is being protected)

The following elements of 43 Arthur Street South should be considered heritage attributes in a designation under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act:

Image shows buildings to be designated

Building #1 – Allan’s Distillery

  • Massing of the building including the exterior walls and the gable roof;
  • Exterior limestone walls and board-and-batten dormer (20th century alteration);
  • Original door and window openings;
  • 8-over-8 sash windows on the west elevation;
  • Stone fireplace; and
  • Five storage tanks.

Building #2a – Knitting/Japanning Building

  • Massing of the building including the exterior walls and the low pitch gable roof;
  • Exterior brick and limestone walls;
  • Original door and window openings;
  • Large I-beam members; and
  • Industrial mechanism attached to the ceiling of the second floor

Building #2b – Milling Building

  • Massing of the building including the exterior walls and the low shed roof;
  • Exterior brick and limestone walls;
  • Original window openings;
  • Heavy timber interior structure; and
  • Large I-beam members.

Building #2c – Tower

  • Massing of the building including the exterior walls;
  • Exterior limestone walls;
  • Original door and window openings;
  • Three original wood windows at the north elevation at the third floor; and
  • Heavy timber interior structure, and the unique stacked wood and iron rod truss system.

Building #2d – General Office and Shipping Building

  • Massing of the building including the exterior walls;
  • Exterior limestone walls;
  • Signage panels on the north elevation, of note the ‘General

Office sign

  • Original door and window openings;
  • Extant portion of brick chimney; and
  • Heavy timber structure.

It is intended that non-original features may be returned to documented earlier designs or to their documented original without requiring City Council permission for an alteration to the designation.

Staff report to Council

View the October 10, 2017 staff report to Council (pages 4-26) [PDF 6MB]

For more information

Stephen Robinson, Senior Heritage Planner
Planning Services
519-822-1260 extension 2496
stephen.robinson@guelph.ca

Any person may, before the 30 day of November 2017, send by registered mail or deliver to the Clerk of the City of Guelph, a notice of objection to this proposed designation, setting out the reason for the objection and all relevant facts. If a notice of objection is received, the Council of the City of Guelph shall refer the matter to the Conservation Review Board for a hearing.

Stephen O’Brien, City Clerk
City of Guelph
1 Carden Street
Guelph, ON N1H 3A1